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How do you compost? RSS

Growing Ideas Blog


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Until last year, I bought pre-bagged mushroom compost at my local garden center. It cost me a pretty penny, and in truth, I didn't think there was any alternative. There was no way that my current living situation could accommodate a composting system — right? Wrong!

Since we've expanded our Composting section in our shop, I've learned that there is truly a composter for every space. With the right container, even my 500 sq ft apartment outside the city can contain enough compost for my community garden plot.

As easy as 1-2-3, here is my No-Fuss Method for all of those beginners out there like me:

   1. I toss my organic kitchen scraps into the Odor-Free Compost Pail that I keep under my sink.

   2. When it's full, I take a trip outside to my Junior Rotating Composter that is kept right next to my trash bin.
   Next to the GeoBin, the Junior is the smallest we have and still holds 7 cubic feet of compost.

   3. The wheeled base makes it easy to rotate, so I can just add my scraps and aerate them right away.
   Voilà — fresh compost in two weeks!

For those out there with a little more space, there are tumblers and vented bins for every taste. Nichole, our Commerce Director, swears by her Worm Factory, which she keeps under her sink — just like my Compost Pail. Her red wiggler worms work at a fast pace, with each worm consuming its weight in kitchen scraps daily. Vermicomposting is a natural fit for school gardens for its science connection, but worms make great family pets, too!

Are you new to composting? Check out the National Gardening Association's article, Compost 101 for beginner's tips — and then get your kids hooked on composting with our Kids Compost Activity Guide!



How to dye eggs — naturally! RSS

Growing Ideas Blog


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Sure — fruit, veggies, and herbs are healthy and delicious. But they have other uses as well! Plants have been used for centuries as natural dyes, adding color and design to fabric, cosmetics, and accessories. Cultures throughout history have used plant pigments for reasons associated with status, class, and religion. Natural dyes are also a beautiful way to play with food! With minimal materials, some stovetop simmering, and creativity — you can teach your kids how everyday foods and spices can produce pastel dyes perfect for spring.



Egg-citing Colors

Step 1: Hard-boil large, white eggs in a pot of water.

Step 2: Make one or more natural dye baths, then cool each bath in the refrigerator.

Step 3: Soak eggs in the desired dye bath. Stir the eggs a few times to distribute equal color. Typical time: 10-30 minutes.

Step 4: Use a slotted spoon to remove eggs from dye bath and set on a wire rack to dry.


BLUE

Boil one head of shredded purple cabbage in 4 cups of water.
Stir in 1 tablespoon of white vinegar and simmer for about 30 minutes. Remove cabbage and save for a later recipe. Reserve liquid for a dye bath and cool in the fridge.



PINK

Cut 3 beets into chunks and add to 3 cups boiling water. Stir in 1 tablespoon of white vinegar and simmer for 10-15 minutes.
Remove beets and save for a later recipe. Reserve liquid for a dye
bath and cool in the fridge.



Want GREEN?

Just place eggs that have been dyed yellow into the blue dye!




YELLOW

Add 6 tablespoons turmeric and 1 tablespoon white vinegar to 4 cups boiling water. Take off heat and stir until spice is dissolved. Let cool in the fridge.


ORANGE

Boil 3 cups water and add the skins of 6 yellow onions. Stir in 1 tablespoon of white vinegar and simmer for 5-10 minutes and strain liquid. Let cool in the fridge.




Turn your egg-dying experience into a history lesson with our article on Extracting Nature’s Colors. Want more? Check out our Plant Based Dye Kit available in our online shop!



April Fools' Day Fun RSS

Growing Ideas Blog


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The turn from winter to spring marks a holiday that I always like to observe: April Fools' Day. The first of April is a day of light-heartedness and fun. Teach your kids that April Fools' Day is a time for delightful surprises with a harmless prank inspired by nature and nutrition. I give you The Chocolate Chickpea Flower Pot Trick.
Serve this chocolate dessert in clean, 2 ½" clay flower pots as an after-dinner treat. Kids will squeal in surprise as you hungrily dig in and eat the "soil." April Fools! The "soil" is really yummy, moist brownies topped with crushed Oreos!

And this delicious dessert is disguised in more ways than just one. The crumbled brownies are actually made from protein-packed chickpeas, and contain no wheat, butter, or eggs. So after kids are finished gobbling them down, you can announce "April Fools!" again, because they just ate a heaping portion of healthy beans!



Chocolate Chickpea Flower Pots

(makes 6 large brownies)

Note: You can find packs of 2 1/2" clay flower pots at your local craft store! Remember to buy food-safe pots, or line your pots with paper cupcake liners before serving.



Ingredients:


1 15-oz can
chickpeas, drained

1 cup maple syrup

1/4 cup cocoa
powder

1/2 cup all natural almond butter or peanut butter

1/4 teaspoon baking powder

1/4 teaspoon baking soda

1/4 tsp salt

1 tbsp vanilla

2-3 Oreo Cookies,
for garnish (optional)

Sprigs of mint, for garnish

1/2 cup coconut
milk


Method:

• Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Lightly spray a 9 x 9 baking pan with nonstick cooking spray.

• In a food processor, puree the first 7 ingredients until smooth. Add the vanilla and blend again.

• Pour batter into baking pan. Bake for about 30 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean.

• Let the brownies completely cool. Cut into 6 large pieces and transfer to a wire rack.

• Wash and dry the baking pan. Transfer the brownies back into the pan and pour the coconut milk in equal amounts over each. Cover with plastic wrap and put in the fridge for about an hour.





To serve:

• Take baking pan out of the refrigerator and remove plastic wrap.

• With a spatula, transfer one large brownie into each clean, empty, clay flower pot.

• With a spoon/fork, crush and crumble the brownie, which now should have a slight pudding consistency from the coconut milk.

• Insert a sprig of mint into each pot of "soil" to look like a growing "sprout."

• Separate the Oreo cookies and crush up the chocolate cookie wafers. Sprinkle a thin layer of crushed cookies in each flower pot and around your "sprout" to mimic a top layer of soil.

• Dig in!



Looking for more ways to encourage healthy eating habits? Download this lesson plan on Serving Nutrition at Home and be sure to stock up on supplies in the Health and Nutrition section of our shop!



Join us for #FoodDayChat on 3/24/14 at 2pm ET RSS

Growing Ideas Blog


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We're thrilled to partner with Food Day for their monthly #FoodDayChat.

What is #FoodDayChat, you ask?

Food Day is a year-round movement for healthy, affordable, and sustainable food — culminating on October 24, a day of action & advocacy. #FoodDayChat is a Twitter conversation hosted by Food Day on the 24th of every month, inviting people around the world to discuss topics that relate to the Food Day movement. Each month is a different topic and March's theme is all about gardening!

Food Day has asked the National Gardening Association for their input on a variety of questions about gardening. And today, March 24, at 2pm ET, we'll be sharing our answers to all of them — but more importantly, we want to hear from YOU!

Tell us why YOU think gardening is important. How does it help people lead healthier lives and build stronger communities? What challenges have you faced with your garden? Is there a link between gardening and nutrition? Share your thoughts on all of these questions and more and you could win a Kid's Organic Bundle from the Gardening With Kids online shop!

Follow @FoodDay2014, @NatlGardening, and #FoodDayChat today at 2pm ET. See you then!



Square Foot Gardening Contest! Enter for your chance to win RSS

Growing Ideas Blog


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We're excited to offer Mel Bartholomew's brand NEW book, Square Foot Gardening with Kids in our online Kids Shop! To celebrate, we're giving away a whole set of his Square Foot Gardening books (4 total), including Square Foot Gardening with Kids.

Want to win? Just answer this question:

According to Mel, beets are great to plant in a square foot garden because they teach kids the difference between roots and tubers. So what do you think: is a beet a root or a tuber?

Send your answer to sales@garden.org by March 31st. A winner will be randomly selected on April 4th.



New Early Season Gardening Products RSS

Growing Ideas Blog


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To all those seasoned gardeners out there, it's time that I come clean:

My name is Susan and I don't know what a cloche is.

I'll admit that when I first laid eyes on this long, bell-shaped, clear, plastic cover sitting in my office — I just assumed it was some sort of cold frame. And then I picked it up. There was no way that a cold frame could be so light. Was it a row cover? Maybe — but not just any row cover. It was too sturdy and tough. It even had a powder-coated steel frame. Usually row covers don't have adjustable air vents, either.

I grabbed the mystery product by its handle on top and carried it down to our Commerce Department.

"What is this?" I asked Nichole, our Commerce Director. She told me it was our new Early Season Garden Cloche.

A what?

Pronounced klohsh, this lightweight cover is meant to protect young plants from frost and other harsh weather conditions. It also keeps away pests and animals. Our cloche's clear, UV-resistant plastic warms the soil to promote quick growth and is tough enough to last season after season. There's no doubt that our Early Season Garden Cloche is a must-have for spring lessons in the school garden — but it can also easily take learning beyond the classroom and teach children about healthy plant development at home in the backyard.

Are you excited for spring? Save 10% on your own Early Season Garden Cloche when you enter CLOCHE14 at checkout now through March 28 — and discover all of our NEW products today. It's time to get growing!



March is National Nutrition Month RSS


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It's interesting that National Nutrition Month falls after February — the month famous for Valentine's Day treats. I've certainly had my fill of chocolates and am definitely ready to start eating healthier.

Nutrition doesn't have to mean constantly counting calories or keeping within strict dietary guidelines. Healthy eating can be as simple as pairing nutritious foods together and making a habit of it. For kids, this can be more challenging to achieve, as underdeveloped taste buds often make for picky eaters. However, when healthy snacks can be prepared in an appealing way, suddenly good nutrition is not only possible — but fun!

To celebrate National Nutrition Month, here are two fresh and healthy snack ideas:



Sweet Snail

This is a great weekend lunch for preschoolers, or a satisfying after-school snack for elementary and middle schoolers that's bound to hold them over until dinner.

• Make a PB&J sandwich and cut out a circle for the snail's shell. You can add a fun, spiral design to the top of the bread with a few extra drizzles of jam. Lay the mini sandwich round on a plate.

• Next, peel a banana (save the discarded peel for your compost pail) and lay it on the plate so it curves up, like a smile. Position it under the snail's shell.

• Lastly, break a thin pretzel stick in half and stick them into the end of the banana for the snail's antennae. Add some eyes and a smile with a few more drops of jam.



Tangy Turtle

A definite crowd-pleaser, this tasty terrapin provides a fruity boost of energy!

• Take one Granny Smith apple and cut near the core, so you're left with a bowl-shaped piece.

• Next, cut off the rounded part of the bowl, so you end up with a thick, flat circle of fruit. This is the turtle's shell.

• Grab a handful of green grapes (approximately 9). Using a knife, slice 1 grape lengthwise and then again in half. Position these grape pieces around the turtle's shell, round side out. These are the turtle's feet.

• Make flat, circular grape pieces by cutting off the rounded ends of 7 more grapes. Position these grape circles on top of your apple shell. Now the turtle's shell is spotted!

• Add a whole grape for the turtle's head and make a pointed grape turtle tail.



Want more fun ideas to boost your child's nutrition? Follow our Kids' Health & Nutrition board on Pinterest!



Books In Bloom is HERE! RSS


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Last week, we had a couple of visitors to the office. Who were they? None other than Valerie Bang-Jensen and Mark Lubkowitz, the pair behind the highly anticipated NEW K-5 curriculum, Books in Bloom — from the National Gardening Association.

As our fans know, Books in Bloom has been available for pre-order for 2 months at a special price, and with an added bonus for the first 200 orders. Last week, Valerie and Mark came equipped with green felt-tipped pens — ready to sign those first 200 copies.

Books in Bloom invites children to learn about science and nature while experiencing a great story. Each chapter focuses on a popular children's book and features quick and easy lesson ideas, hands-on activities, and full lesson plans that relate the text to multiple disciplines. In addition, reference icons clearly identify appropriate grade levels, and lists of related titles are included for alternative reading levels and connections to Common Core State Standards and Next Generation Science Standards.

"Because elementary school teachers teach all subjects, they really need to be aware of looking at literature with different lenses, not just the literary elements," explained Valerie. "We wanted to make sure there were books of different genres. There's fiction, nonfiction, there's poetic language in some of them – it's a broad range. There's something for everyone."

Don't miss this opportunity to receive your own signed copy of Books in Bloom. With only 100 signed copies still left, they're going fast! Order today: http://www.gardeningwithkids.org/books-in-bloom.html.



Announcing our 2014 Digital Catalog RSS


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I'm excited to share our Gardening With Kids catalog. With a sweep of my finger, I can flip through pages on my tablet over my morning coffee. Not only that, but with over 500 direct links embedded within the 68-page book, I can easily shop for fresh gardening goodies for spring.

And for all of those school and community gardeners out there — listen up! This year's catalog features students from Cambridge Elementary School in Jeffersonville, Vermont. Next year's catalog could feature YOU.

The National Gardening Association has created the Be in Our 2015 Catalog Contest, inspired by those teachers and parents who use our products as educational tools every day.

That's right — it's time to dig into that worm compost bin and snap a picture with your red wigglers. Or send us a photo of your classroom harvesting this summer's tomato crop. The five best submissions will win honorary packages for their garden and the winning submission will be featured in our 2015 product catalog! And no matter what, all submissions will receive a free gift from gardeningwithkids.org.

Enter the Be in our Catalog Contest today!



Homemade Valentines RSS

Growing Ideas Blog


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Valentine's Day is your chance to express heartfelt sentiments in a creative way. This year, instead of browsing those red-and-pink themed aisles of your local convenience store, try your hand at a homemade valentine — inspired by garden-fresh blooms.


Sweet Scents

A card with a built-in perfume! If your flower garden is hibernating for the winter and you don't have an indoor arrangement to pull from, stop by your local florist or supermarket for donations of old flowers.

While roses are the most popular choice on Valentine's Day, other fantastically fragrant flower options include lavender, lilac, peony, hydrangea, and jasmine.



Materials:

• Cardstock/scrapbook paper

• Cheesecloth

• Scissors

• Glue stick

• Flower petals









Method:

1. Fold the cardstock/scrapbook paper in half and cut to preferred card size.

2. Using a pair of scissors, cut a heart design out of the cheesecloth.

3. Glue the "V" of the cheesecloth heart to the front of your card, leaving the top of the heart unattached. Let glue harden for about 2-3 minutes.

4 . Fill the cheesecloth heart with flower petals and arrange them to your liking.

5. Pull the cheesecloth taut and glue the heart tightly closed. This is important; in a day or two, the petals will dry and shrink up a bit and you want your heart to keep its shape!




Now that your sweet-smelling design is set, add any additional designs or flourishes. And don't forget to include a personalized message on the inside of your card.

Have a long list of valentines to give? Customize each card! Mix rose petals and dried citrus peel for a fresh scent, or combine jasmine petals and red winterberries for a textured look.

For more homemade, garden-inspired gift articles, check out these ideas on our website. And follow us on Pinterest for plenty of Valentine's Day decorations.



Time to Plan Your Garden RSS

Growing Ideas Blog



There's nothing better than curling up with a good book on a cold, winter's night. In my case, I've been curling up with two books: Everyday Garden Solutions in one hand (a great resource for companion planting) and my Garden Journal in the other. If you've been gardening for more than one season, you are well aware that winter is an excellent time to plan for summer. If this year is your first crack at growing — grab a pen and start sketching!

I am lucky to have secured a community garden plot for the past 2 years, with a square plot measuring 25' x 25' to work with. Even though I've moved the location of my garden crops a bit between those first two years, I've still battled with pests, pulled too many weeds, and ended up with tired soil by early August. Now, for my third growing season, I've decided to mix things up and completely rotate my crops to keep the overwintering pests guessing and my soil's nutrients in balance.

But there's more to garden planning than crop rotation. A gardener must also consider the bigger picture — the overall design of the space — to be able to maximize the area and plan efficiently.

Here's a simple design idea that I use year after year:

I always begin with an 8' x 8' raised bed in the center of the plot, and have used it to grow a variety of vegetables in the past. This year, I'm going to devote the whole bed to growing my very first pumpkin and surround it with colorful marigolds and nasturtiums, which will help deter pests.

I then encircle (or en-square in this case) my raised bed with a walkway covered with straw to keep the weeds at bay. What I'm left with is one, giant outer square — corners included — to utilize for the rest of my crops. The geometric shape of the walkway allows me to have full access to every plant, without having to wind in between rows, and the consistent square-within-a-square design makes my garden look organized, even when weeds are at their worst.

If you're planning your summer garden, make sure to check out February's deal in our Year of Savings. Save 10% on all seed starting supplies (including Growlab® light gardens) AND receive bonus organic sunflower seeds. Just use code HEARTGWK2 at checkout.

Want more ideas? Follow us on Pinterest for seed starting ideas, design tips, and more!



Spring Catalog Sneak Peek RSS

Growing Ideas Blog



It's hard to believe that GWK is already planning its second catalog of the year! Our spring book has been designed with the educator in mind, and our team has gone out of their way to hand-pick and test out products that will work well for a wider age range: grades PreK-8.

One of the most unique aspects of the new catalog is our handy Icon Key.

Our in-house educators have carefully selected items that are best-suited for a Pre-K level, while our horticulturists have chosen products that are great for school gardens — and equally valuable for home use. Because after all, many educators are Moms and Dads themselves who strive to incorporate health and nutrition in their daily family routine.

What else? We've recently added 20 new products to our shop that we're excited for you to experience, with even more on the way as the growing season approaches! From an innovative Elevated Raised Bed that is completely self-watering to an all-purpose Food Grade Rain Barrel to a Superior Greenhouse — all of our NEW products will have you thinking of spring!

Is there something you'd like to see added to our catalogs? What products would help make your home and school garden grow? Email us with your suggestions and feedback — we'd love to hear your ideas!



For the Birds RSS

Growing Ideas Blog


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I noticed a tiny chickadee all fluffed up under a corner eave of my front porch the other night, which made me wonder about his winter whereabouts.

Sure, my shivering feathered friend had food, but did he have a home? Worried, I set to work on constructing simple little refuges around my yard for him — or any other bird braving bitter cold winds and icy conditions.


Nesting Pocket:

I designed this cozy insulated pouch with my chickadee friend in mind. Nesting pockets are very easy to make and can usually be constructed from materials you have on hand.



What you need:


Wire mesh

Stuffing material
(moss, dryer lint, even
animal hair!)

Pair of pliers







How to make:

• Using a piece of wire mesh about 12x32 inches, I laid it down flat and piled my stuffing material onto one half until the layer was about one inch thick. I folded the rest of the wire over to make a stuffing sandwich and secured the wire on all sides.

• Then, I rolled it up and shaped one end to close, which took a little extra securing. For this, I recommend using a piece of wire to "sew" through the mesh.

• The last step involved shaping the other end — the opening to my bird's nesting pocket. Then, I placed the pouch in the tree next to my front porch and voilà — there was a snug little home for my chickadee!








If you're feeling extra crafty, you can also try making a Nesting Box for winter birds. The National Gardening Association has a helpful article on how to build a Nesting Box that will guide you through the process.

And if DIY isn't your thing, you're in luck! The Gardening With Kids shop is having a sale on all bird supplies this week. Visit our weekly specials page and choose a birdhouse for every member of the flock!




5 Easy Steps to Winter Sowing RSS

Growing Ideas Blog



For those of you who have been keeping up with the recent Polar Vortex, it may seem that outdoor winter gardening is impossible in Vermont right now. A daily temperature in the teens with a wind chill falling into the negatives does not exactly bode well for germination. However, I've been hearing a lot about a method of seed starting called Winter Sowing, invented by Trudi Davidoff, and wondered how well it'd work in the frosty region where I live.


What is Winter Sowing?

An outdoor method of winter germination.


What do you need to Winter Sow?

• An empty milk jug

• Well-draining soil mixture (I used Espoma Organic Peat Moss Potting Soil)

• Duct tape

• A pair of scissors for punching holes in the jug

• Seeds of your choice



How to Winter Sow — in 5 easy steps:

1. Make a miniature greenhouse out of an empty milk jug.

Actually, you can use any container you want, just as long as light can penetrate through its walls. Once you've chosen a container, use a knife to cut around the middle. Don't cut all the way around. Leave about an inch uncut to serve as a hinge. Next, use a pair of scissors to punch multiple holes in the bottom of the jug to facilitate proper draining. These holes will also help your little seeds breathe. No need to keep the cap on the jug, either; your seeds will benefit from the extra ventilation.

2. Fill with soil and water

Find a well-draining soil mixture and fill the bottom half of your jug with it. Make sure the soil is about 1-2 inches below your cut-line. Moisten the soil and let it drain.

3. Plant your seeds.

It's time to sow! Follow the instructions on your seed packet and sow your seeds according to their proper depth requirements. I've heard that the hardier the variety, the better the result. Because of this, I tried broccoli raab seeds in my jug. Replace the "lid" you cut into your mini-container greenhouse and secure it with some duct tape. If you're going to make more than one of these, I suggest labeling your containers. By the time they begin to grow in early spring, you may forget what you planted!

4. Set your jug outside.

Find a location that will be relatively safe from curious animals and strong winds — you don't want your jug to accidentally tip over. Set your jug on a patio table, on the deck, next to a fence — anywhere that is secure.

5. Sit back and wait!

Sometimes I worry about my little jug on my front deck among all that snow — and I wonder how the seeds will survive under such extreme conditions. I learned that my seeds will freeze and thaw at various times over the course of the season, which will loosen the seed coatings and prepare them for germination. Once it nears spring, and even when temperatures still fall below freezing, I've been told that little sprouts will emerge in my jug. When this happens, it will be important to check the soil moisture and water the little seedlings before closing the tops again.


Try winter sowing your own seeds to beat those winter blues with the promise of spring! Let your kids decorate their own jugs and make it a cold-weather activity for the whole family.

For more winter activities and regional tips, sign up for our emails!



2014: The Year of the Tomato RSS

Growing Ideas Blog



Every year, I make resolutions that focus on improving my physical and mental health – and an extra one specifically for my garden. I've tried to expand my knowledge of gardening through each growing season and learn from every success and failure. But after warring with weeds, trying to save the bees, and lots of help from our Growing Ideas Pinterest board — there remains one fact that persists year after year: I can't grow tomatoes.

I have tried growing tomatoes from seed and I've tried starter tomato plants. I've had horticulturists diagnose and offer treatments for my tomatoes' illnesses after taking one look at the shriveled, dotted, or yellowed leaves that are always an end result. Nothing seems to work. If only I had GWK's new Superior Greenhouse, then my tomatoes may have had a warm, strong start to their life. Or if I had actually acted on my previous great idea and installed a basement light garden, their roots would be healthy enough for transplanting. Maybe it's the support system in place. Perhaps my little tomatoes need a Cedar Pyramid Trellis to brace their stems and offer protection from high winds. Or maybe it's the soil. Whatever the cause — in two years, my plants have yielded one half-green Beefsteak tomato the size of a golf ball and a handful of cherry tomatoes. Meanwhile, my neighboring community gardeners' juicy red and yellow tomatoes have always hung in multitudes, just waiting to be plucked, sliced, and enjoyed in a delicious Caprese Salad.

Thus, for the 2014 growing season, I've decided to research and successfully grow multiple tomatoes. My target varieties? Cherry, Roma — and my biggest challenge — Brandywine.

And while I don't yet have the outdoor area yet for a Superior Greenhouse — sigh — I do have the perfect spot for a Three Season Cold Frame, a smaller alternative that still offers heat insulation for my tiny tomatoes, but takes up less space. It's just one of the many NEW products that GWK has to offer this year.

The best part? This January, I'll save 10% on any NEW product AND receive a free gift with each purchase by using code NEW4GWK2 at checkout through Jan. 31. This month's free gift is an Eco-Friendly Plant Container, which promotes healthy root growth. It's even biodegradable, so it can be planted directly into the ground. Sounds like the perfect container for my Brandywine Challenge!

And because January is just the beginning of the GWK Year of Savings, I know there will be more new products and special deals to look forward to all year long. Haven't heard about GWK's Year of Savings yet? Sign up for our emails! With new specials every two weeks and an exclusive shop promotion each month, it's the perfect way to start the new year!



Fresh Food for Schools RSS

Growing Ideas Blog



When I attended school in Massachusetts — first at a parochial and then at a public school — I never knew where my cafeteria's food originated from. For the majority of the school weeks, my mother packed nutritious lunches for my siblings and me. But some days, she handed us $2 each and told us to buy lunch.

My peers and I waited in line passively for our food. I noticed large boxes pulled from the freezer. The calzone I just purchased was clearly not made fresh that day. Instead, it came out of a box that came from…? And where was the lettuce for the salad bar actually grown? Nonetheless, we ate our food hungrily. What strikes me now as an adult was that I never actually questioned it.

Today, the whole concept of the school lunch has been given some serious attention. Some cafeteria workers chop, dice, sauté, and bake for students. Schools are even hiring professional chefs as School Food Directors, and many schools are cooking fresh food daily using local ingredients. Food may come from neighboring farms or businesses, and even from the school's own garden. That's right — as our fans know, schools are utilizing green space to grow vegetables, and others are installing raised beds over unused concrete to cultivate fruit. Teachers are taking their learning outside to teach math, science, art, and literature in the garden. Students are creating gardening clubs and using physical education periods to harvest food — which is then used in their own school lunches.

But not every school is doing this. For many schools, this is a far-reaching dream. Budget constraints and limited support hinder garden-based learning from becoming a staple.

That's why the National Gardening Association created A Garden in Every School® initiative. We believe that young people who participate in school garden programs improve their knowledge of good nutrition, broaden their tastes in terms of food choices, and increase their consumption of vegetables and fruits.

We want our initiative implemented in every school — and we've started in Jersey City, NJ. Our Jersey City partner is City Green and together, we plan to create 40 successful, sustainable garden programs in all 40 area schools over the course of five years.

There are many ways to become engaged and to make A Garden in Every School® a reality for Jersey City. Lend your support by volunteering, spreading the word to community members and potential donors, endorsing our work, and of course, by giving generously to this important cause.

Did I mention the perks? Not only will donating get your New Year off to a great start — you'll earn gardening gifts with each contribution! Find out more and donate today



Getting Creative for the Holidays RSS

Growing Ideas Blog



Julie, our Youth Education Program Director, approached me last month with a holiday gift idea that she just couldn't wait to try. Her idea was simple: take two of our new Pistachio Tubtrugs® and fill them with personalized gifts — one for her sister and one for her mother.

I loved her idea and immediately adopted it for my own — even including it as one of my Top 3 No-Fail Gift-Buying Techniques.

Two days ago, Julie sent me pictures of her completed Tubtrug® gifts. Gorgeous!

Inspired, I went around the office. What other unique gifts were my co-workers giving this year? Nichole, our Commerce Director, was giving holiday plants in customized pots. Sabrina, our Customer Service extraordinaire, was giving eco-planters filled with fresh herbs. Jon, our Graphic Designer, even used our Pizza Garden Seed Collection in a pizza-themed gift for his dad! Clearly, creativity abounds with products that promote wellness & nutrition.

Wishing you the happiest and healthiest of holidays — from everyone here at GWK!



Holiday Fun with the Family RSS

Growing Ideas Blog



We all know that these final days before the holidays are a great time to finish shopping, but they're also a fabulous time to get creative with fresh, natural decorations and homemade gifts. And with school vacation right around the corner, there's no doubt that younger ones will want to get involved in all the fun.

Here are some favorite family projects sure to get everyone in the holiday spirit:

Holiday Tweets: Give your feathered visitors the energy they need to survive the cold weather — and liven up your landscape at the same time with DIY Wild Bird Decorations. Berried garlands and seeded ornaments can last well after the holidays, when the winter months are snowiest. Handmade outdoor ornaments are also great gifts for kids to make and give.

Say "Thank You": Teach kids the importance of showing appreciation for all of those wonderful holiday gifts they receive from family and friends by making Pressed Flower Thank-you cards. Gather flowers and leaves and make beautiful nature-inspired cards to send out in the New Year!

Have a Ball with Seeds: Have a family member that loves herbs? Another that's crazy about flowers? Seed bombs are super easy to make and can be customized to each person's interests. The best part? They're low maintenance, so they make great gifts for brown thumbs, too. Just toss and water!

Start Talking Scents: Not only do dried flowers smell amazing, but they look good, too! Try your hand at some Dried Flower Creations this year. Ask florists or supermarkets for donations of old flowers and hang or oven-dry the petals. Fill sachets with a potpourri mixture and tie with a festive ribbon. Experiment with seasonal aromas; try combining cloves, cinnamon sticks, roses and lemon peels for a spicy-sweet scent!

For more great ideas, follow us on Twitter, Pinterest, and Facebook!



Last Minute Holiday Gift Ideas RSS

Growing Ideas Blog



There are two approaches to holiday shopping: buying gifts in a well-planned, timely manner — and waiting until the last minute. While I like to think of myself as a person who has all her ducks in a row, I just haven't had time to commit to holiday shopping yet. Because of this, I've been living in fear and dreading that stressful, last-minute, binge-shopping spree. Just the thought of driving from store to store any time after December 16 makes me nervous. Oh, the crowds!

To reduce my own growing stress — and to help any of my other ill-timed friends achieve gifting success — I've been brainstorming a plan of attack for my holiday shopping this week.

Here are my Top 3 No-Fail Gift-Buying Techniques sure to keep the holiday season merry and bright:

  1. Buy a gift basket and break it up
  2. It sounds too easy, but when there are a lot of people to buy for, this method comes in handy. Have two little cousins who just adore arts & crafts? A Garden Art Gift Bag can easily be made into two fabulous gifts for artsy little ones. Want to give a few teacher gifts this year? Break up the Ultimate Educator Tub! You get the idea.

  3. Make your own gift basket
  4. Another simple concept that's one of my favorites. With a good friend in mind, I picked up one of GWK's newest products, the Shallow Pistachio Tubtrug and filled it with a loofah, bath salts, essential oils, and all sorts of goodies for a truly soothing foot bath. Try picking just one favorite activity and designing a gift basket around it. And when the "basket" is part of the gift - it's more fun!

  5. When in doubt, a gift card will do
  6. Have an enthusiastic gardener in your life and don't know what to give them? Don't dwell on it! Instead, choose a Gift Certificate and include a homemade card with a personalized message inside. Who wouldn't love that?

This week, it's time to finish that shopping! Discover even more gift ideas in GWK's Holiday Catalog and make last-minute spending a thing of the past. Use coupon code SHOPRIGHT now through Dec. 15 to save $10 on all orders $50 or more.



TODAY ONLY: Cyber Monday Special Offer RSS

Growing Ideas Blog




My holiday gift list just keeps getting longer. And with so many people to buy for this year, I like to take advantage of early-bird online shop specials. That way, I can avoid parking lot wars and long checkout lines.

What's my favorite holiday deals? The ones that include a little something extra, of course.

Check out GWK's special offer above and act fast; this deal is for TODAY ONLY!


Giving Thanks RSS

Growing Ideas Blog



This year, I've decided to start a new Thanksgiving family tradition with a nature-inspired project: a homemade Giving Thanks Tree.

Family members will be prompted to think of something they are thankful for at any point during our Thanksgiving dinner. Each person will have a hand-cut leaf and pencil on their placemats - ready to be used whenever inspiration strikes. My Giving Thanks Tree will be displayed on the buffet table beside the dining room table - its branches bare and waiting. After dinner, family members will hang their leaves on the tree and swap sentiments.

Personally, I know that I have a lot to be thankful for in my life. Just what would I do without my health, my family, my hound dog Mason - and my Junior Rotating Composter? Good thing I have a head start - so I can make up my mind when it comes to my own Giving Thanks Tree reflection.

Here's a simple guide to make your own Giving Thanks tree:

    Supply List:

  • Mini-planter or decorative container
  • Soil to fill the planter and support the Giving Thanks Tree
  • Moss & acorns to cover the soil around the Giving Thanks Tree
  • Tree branch (Make sure it's not too heavy, but still has some little branches attached!)
  • Hot glue gun
  • Construction paper
  • Hole punch
  • Scissors
  • Twine
  • Markers (or crayons, pens, or pencils for writing sentiments)



    Step 1: Hot glue your tree branch to the bottom of the container/planter your Giving Thanks Tree will sit in.

    Step 2: Once the glue is dry, fill the rest of the planter with soil to support the branch. Decorate the soil around the tree with moss and acorns until the soil is covered.

    Step 3: Cut out a favorite leaf pattern from construction paper (Mine is the Vermont Sugar Maple!) Make sure there is space for family members to write at least one sentiment.

    Step 4: Punch holes in the top portion of each cut leaf and add twine loops for hanging. Put a leaf at each family member's place at the table with a marker, crayon, pen or pencil to write with.







A Giving Thanks Tree is a creative way to celebrate Thanksgiving with loved ones. Check out our Family Activities page for more fun and easy ideas and be sure to follow us on Pinterest for tons of nature-inspired ways to enjoy the holidays!

Want even more to be thankful for? Check out our exclusive holiday offer from our online shop!

Have a happy and safe Thanksgiving from all of us here at GWK!


Innovate RSS

Growing Ideas Blog



in•no•va•tion n. 1.a new idea, device, or method Merriam-Webster Dictionary, http://www.merriam-webster.com/


I am a huge fan of innovation; but really, who isn't? Without the zipper, we'd be forced to fumble around with buttons. Remember having to cart rolls of film all the way to the store to be developed? Now digital photos are a download away. Even the concept of the road has been improved upon; these days, I can drive on a highway from Vermont to Massachusetts in less than 4 hours and be just in time for my parent's Thanksgiving dinner.

But what about innovations for the garden? GWK has us covered. They've harvested some new products - and they're in fresh for the holiday season.

Who needs a heavy watering can anymore when the EcoSpout can turn any used plastic soda bottle into a lightweight version? Why bother aerating compost the old-fashioned way when a simple push on the Junior Rotating Composter sends it spinning?

Waxy crayons are out and organic Veggie Crayons are most definitely in. And my favorite? A 90-gallon rain barrel made to resemble a tree trunk - complete with a planter for growing fresh blooms on top. Beautiful AND functional -- brilliant!

Innovate your holiday shopping with GWK's new products. Find more ideas here



Top 10 Holiday Garden Gifts RSS

Growing Ideas Blog



Garden gifts make the holidays a little brighter! Whether homemade or from a shop, these gifts offer a reminder of sunny days and fresh, blooming bounty. To help spread a little joy this season, we are sharing our TOP 10 favorite garden gift ideas. Some invite family playtime while others are simply great gifts that any gardener would love.

1. Garden Gift Baskets & Bags (Ages 3+, $24.95-$49.95)
We have gift baskets for practically every budding gardener! Artsy gardeners love our new Garden Art Gift Bag, little birders go wild for our Bird Lover's Gift Bag, and our Kid's Gardening Gift Tub is a great choice for any young gardening enthusiast. All of our baskets arrive gift packaged and ready for the holidays!

2. Homemade Botanical Paper (Ages 3+)
Give that extra special holiday card by creating seed-infused, botanical paper. A fun activity to do with your children, homemade paper can be used for a variety of purposes whether it is artwork for a loved one, notecards for recipes, or bookmarks—the possibilities are endless!

3. Nature Rubbing Plates (Ages 3+, $9.95 each or buy the complete set for $35.95)
These best-selling and easy-to-use Nature Rubbing Plates are sure to spark creativity in young people. Pair them with Veggie Crayons to create a variety of designs or paint plates and place clean paper over the top to make imprints! However you use them, they are always a hit.

4. Designer Seed Bombs (Ages 6+)
Want to make amazing seed bombs? Take seed bombs to the next level by incorporating savvy plant mixes. Try to make an Italian Herb seed bomb with basil, oregano, and Italian flat-leaf parsley seed or try a French herb seed bomb with tarragon, lavender, and chervil seed. Pressed for time to make your own? Check out our Tasty Herb Bombs ready to drop for your favorite gardener.

5. Grow a Holiday Amaryllis (Ages 6+)
The huge tropical blooms of Amaryllis always add much-needed color to sunny windows and tabletops. There are so many kinds to choose from, in colors ranging from red to apricot, pink and white, and they are so easy to grow. Be sure to save the bulbs for next year's holiday celebration!

6. 6-Piece Kids Tool Set (Ages 6 to 14, $55.95)
Quality built for big jobs, our 6-piece tool set allows young gardeners the chance to rake, hoe, scoop and dig! Brightly colored and featuring hardwood handles, they last for years and can be passed down from one sibling to the next. Sold individually and in a set.

7. Festive Berry Wreaths (Ages 6+)
Winterberries are some of nature's most festive decorations. Learn how to turn their red berried branches into the finest homemade wreaths. It's a fun family project, and they make great gifts!

8. Nature Fandexes (Ages 6+, $10.95 each or by the complete set for $31.99)
Beautiful and perfectly sized for stocking stuffers, our bird, butterfly, tree fandexes help nature explorers learn about common North American species. Each has around 50 plates that include color photos and information such as habitat, diet, and common identifiers.

9. Holiday Tweets for Birds (Ages 3+)
Great for holiday decorating or the bird feeding enthusiast in your life, these seed ornaments bring feathered friends to the backyard. Different ornaments will satisfy different bird species, depending on the seed mix chosen or whether suet is added. Love the idea but don't have time? Check out our Sunflower Birdseed Wreath all ready to go (and weighing in at a hefty 3lbs)!

10. Root Viewer (Ages 5+, $9.95)
Budding botanists will love watching root vegetables grow from the tops up and the roots down with the Root Viewer. Carrots, radishes and onions are grown from sprouts to full harvest right before their eyes! Includes seeds and growing instructions.

These are but a few of many great holiday offerings brought to you by the National Gardening Association. We also encourage you all to take advantage of our Holiday Catalog (psst...look for a special offer inside!). You won't have to look hard to find something perfect for your gardening, nature-loving kids and family.

Love our blog? For more great ideas, follow us on Twitter, Pinterest, and Facebook!

Giving Back RSS

Growing Ideas Blog



Whenever November rolls around, my mind drifts into the near future and focuses on presents. Even though there is a solid month and a half before the holidays, my gift-giving schedule usually requires some prior research.

Now that I've planted roots in Vermont, I have to think creatively when it comes to giving gifts to my family. It's not easy being away from the people you love, especially when they're dotted all around the country. My brother lives in California, my sister and nephew in Texas, and my parents in Massachusetts.

How to solve this intra-national issue?

Easy, I've decided to do my holiday shopping through GWK. Not only will my gifts foster each family member's personal interests, but they'll support the National Gardening Association's mission:

To empower every generation to lead healthier live,, build stronger communities and encourage environmental stewardship through educational gardening programs. You can learn more about our work and watch a great video clip.

So my gifts are making a difference all around.

I can give my 2-year-old nephew his own Audubon Songbirds Nest Set and my brother a space-saving Odor-Free Compost Pail - perfect for his kitchen. Dad would definitely use the Garden Tool Organizer, my sister would love the Salsa Maker and I get to support NGA's non-profit education and grant programs. It's a win-win!

And thank goodness for the Holiday Catalog. It'll give me some creative ideas for the gardener who has it all - Mom.

Check out our Holiday Catalog for fun gift ideas for every member of your family, and as an added bonus, use the coupon code FAMILY10 for $10 off your order of $50 or more!



Bright Ideas RSS

Growing Ideas Blog



I'm excited to write my first blog for Gardening with Kids! My name is Susan and unlike Nichole, I grew up in the city of Boston where urban and rooftop gardens thrive. A Girl Scout for 12 years, I travelled around New England and fostered a love for anything outdoors: hiking, climbing, skiing and whitewater rafting. Now, at the National Gardening Association in Vermont I'm able to combine a passion for nature and a push for educational growth through the world of gardening. I invite you to reach out to me with any questions, stories, and pictures: email me or call (800) 538-7476 ext 111.

I'm sure that by now, everyone has entered our Great Start Giveaway. If not, don't fret! Just place your GWK order through October 30 and you'll be automatically entered to win a GrowLab® SlimLine Two-Tier Light Garden , complete with Basic Seed Starting Kit and horticultural handbook, GrowLab®: A Complete Guide to Gardening in the Classroom.

And speaking of GrowLab®, it's time to shed some light on an ongoing problem that is constantly sprouting up…

Living in a 500 sq ft apartment gives me limited space for my growing collection of shoes - let alone my passion for growing plants. Joe, my significant other, and I had to make an important choice when it came to furnishings: only the essentials.

For Joe, essentials revolve around comfort: a massive high-definition television set and a comfortable 6 ft long couch.

For me, essentials revolve around any kind of space-saving storage pieces that can be used for at least two purposes: function and aesthetics.

So, where do the plants fit in?

Philodendrons hang from the ceiling and cuttings line the windowsills. A jade plant has found a comfortable spot on my kitchen counter, and my herbs are (believe it or not) suspended in the basement in front of the only available window.

Because of this living arrangement, I always run into trouble when I try to start seeds in the spring. There's just not enough room for everything I'd like to eventually transplant into my 25 ft x 25 ft community garden plot - and there's limited light to boot.

The solution: a basement grow light system.

There's a wealth of information about light gardens online and tip and tricks about which fluorescent lights to choose. The National Gardening Association even published a helpful article about the subject.

Because of all the options out there and my admitted inexperience with light gardens, I've had my eye on the GrowLab® SlimLine Two-Tier Light Garden for a while now. Not only does this light garden come with everything I need, but it will definitely become an essential item in my home. I can utilize wasted space (function) and start seeds (function) , while livening up my basement area enormously with plants (aesthetics).

An added bonus? Once I've transplanted all my seeds, I can use the shelving unit as extra storage for my hand tools, gloves, mini-pots and - of course - extra seeds!

Place your order today and learn more about light gardens with a GrowLab SlimLine Two-Tier Light Garden of your own; it's a soon-to-be essential for the home, classroom, and - yes, even basements! For all the latest products we offer - as well as fabulous holiday gift ideas - check out our Holiday Catalog



Repurposing Extravaganza RSS

Growing Ideas Blog

One of my favorite ways to garden is by using containers. Unfortunately, I was not able to experience the garden yield from my containers last year as my St. Bernard, Cerbie, treated the plants growing in them as his personal salad bar. Tipping over peppers and munching on oregano—he has no self-control when it comes to vegetables and herbs. While I can't help but laugh about it now, I still feel the need to be proactive to ensure that everyone in my home has the opportunity to enjoy fresh-from-the-garden foods this year. To this end, I did what anyone else does, I searched for suggestions online.

As with any good search, I became slightly sidetracked and after shopping, stumbled upon an inspiring article from kidsgardening.org titled, Gardening with Creative Containers. I liked its message: why not use a birdcage as a planter? Fabulous. After daydreaming about all things I could repurpose in my home to use as planters and how I could add some more visual interest to my deck area, I decided to take action.

The first repurposed planter was easily identified. We had an ancient pot with a bumpy bottom. I didn't use it to cook, but liked the worn, tough look of the container so I kept it in the garage.... Anyway, enlisting the help of Mike, my husband, we drilled holes in the bottom, filled it with good soil and planted a tomato plant in it. Voilà.

Then my husband, also inspired by the idea of repurposing, decided to turn his liquid nitrogen container (don't ask me why he had one) into a container. Since it is rather large, we planted a Purpleleaf Sand Cherry. The container was really heavy, but looked nice.

Our final repurposing project was the easiest and I think the most eye-catching: we used a colander as a hanging planter! All we needed to do besides planting some strawberries into it was to tie some twine around the handles. Once placed, not only did these containers add a little pizzazz to our deck, they also gave us the chance to reuse items and unleash our creativity! If you would like to find out more about container gardening, I encourage you to check out this month's Regional Gardening Reports. Happy container gardening!

What Do You Trug in Your Tubtrug? RSS

Growing Ideas Blog



Tubtrugs have a variety of uses as noted on the label. For me, their versatility makes them an essential item to own. If you have one, I' m sure you know what I' m talking about. For instance, I do not believe that the ten Tubtrugs scattered around my home and yard are excessive, especially since recently acquiring four sheep and a pony. I use two of my large tubs to keep the hay off the ground so it doesn' t become funky. The other use it' s perfect for is as the pony' s water dish because it is light and once filled, it' s flexible enough that I can hold both handles in one hand. Plus, Tubtrugs are so easy to wash out. My Tubtrugs have also acted as a laundry basket, dog toy bucket, weed transporter, and much more; however, no use as critical as the function it performed this past weekend.

While hanging out in the far pasture and chatting it up with the new neighbors, my husband, Mike, and I noticed a turtle inside our fenced area. The turtle' s panda-like face made it appear almost cute. Catching many reptiles as a youngster with my dad, I developed a solid understanding and appreciation of turtles. Instantly, I knew that this was not just any turtle though, it was a snapper! For those who do not know much about this particular type of turtle, the jaws of a snapper are very strong, and once they grab onto an object it is nearly impossible to get them to let go. They also have flexible necks and this, combined with their jaw makes them a particularly fierce reptile.

Of course our inquisitive pony, Charlotte, wanted to be the snapper' s friend. It was all we could do to grab her halter and move her to another pasture without getting too close to the snapper. We didn' t want to touch it; yet, we needed to move the snapper out of our fence. I felt slightly more confident catching this turtle than the sheep. Yet, the turtle was too large to fit in a five gallon pail. Large Tubtrug to the rescue!

We placed the Tubtrug on the ground tipped on its side. Then using a shovel, we carefully and slowly guided the snapper towards the Tubtrug. After tipping the bucket right side up, we slid the shovel' s handle through the handles of the bucket. Mike and I walked, one on each side of the Tubtrug holding the ends of the shovel, to a nearby pond outside our property and let the snapper go. The turtle happily slid into the water.

Thank goodness for the Tubtrug! Oh and did I mention that they are made of food grade plastic? To celebrate the many functions of this great product, I' m happy to give you 30% off Tubtrugs through the month of June using coupon code: SNAPPER30

Kids Day! RSS

Growing Ideas Blog



Gardening with Kids experienced a first this past weekend; we attended Kids Day, Vermont's largest children's event. The friendly folks at Find & Go Seek invited us to host a table under their tent at Waterfront Park in Burlington. Each organization featured in this tent provided activities that would be fun for kids who attended. Luckily, we were placed next to the hot-spot—the face painting station.

The cuties queued in line waiting to be decorated eagerly peered over to our area where other kids used rubbing plates to explore botany. The Gardening with Kids' table attracted adorable little ones who featured unicorns, butterflies, and tigers on their faces, busily creating types of insects, flowers, and leaves never seen before. Now some may say rubbing plates may limit creativity: however, the wide spectrum of colors and variations seemed to speak to their imagination with no two creations being alike. In fact, one child in particular strove for uniqueness as she carefully shaded using nearly everyone of the plates; she switched out crayons for colored pencils and flowers for leaf plates, all the while regulating the pressure she applied to her medium.

Along with this activity, we were lucky enough to be able to give out free seeds to attendees. Questions such as, "What are seeds? Is there a difference between annuals and perennials? Can I plant them now?" coupled with the children's excitement for helping something so small to grow was inspiring. I should note that the surreal environment of 5,000 excited children also included bouncy castles, free meals for those under the age of 18, and even an extremely patient llama.

We were able to make a lot of connections and got the word out about all the great resources that are available for gardening with kids such as our catalog of educational tools with all purchases supporting our nonprofit educational programs and grants. It was really fun interacting with all of the kids. We also had the chance to talk with organizations that are interested in our mission and offer them materials. In fact, if you have an upcoming event and believe our catalogs and informational bookmarks would be beneficial to your audience, please contact me via email and I' d be happy to have some sent out to you. We believe that when you garden, you grow! Help us to encourage positive change one child, one school, and one community at a time.

Cinco De Mayo Celebration RSS

Growing Ideas Blog



I love Cinco de Mayo because it's a celebration of culture and heritage. Plus, as with most holidays, devouring delicious food is a must. Fortunately, Mike and I have a close friend who is turning, as she terms it, a quarter of a century old, leading me to explore food options for a hipster vegan crowd. (My investigation wasn't necessarily an innate desire, more of a goal to bring THE dish that a diverse group enjoys.) I appreciate a dark, green, earthy drink from the juicer as much as anyone, but this occasion calls for something special as our friend, Leigh, moves away to greener pastures and increased opportunities while pursuing a degree in public health. She's a great person and I believe she has the potential to change the world.

When brainstorming to come up with the perfect dish, I remembered Julie, National Gardening Association's Education Director, giving me a Grow a Salsa Garden recipe and nutrition guide a few weeks back. Fashioning a generous serving of pico de gallo, literally translated as "rooster's beak" became my to-make party dish. While Vermont's northern latitude and my lack of preparation didn't allow me to actually grow a garden, I was able to pick up great ingredients to make the dish; all of the details can be found at the link listed in the final paragraph.

My animals always love it when I cook because it becomes a taste-testing experience. My St. Bernard rescue, Cerbie, loves vegetables, with an aptitude of taste and smell similar to a sommelier—just kidding. Still, he is my cooking buddy and thoroughly approves of the tomatoes, onions, cilantro, parsley, jalapenos, and lime—all of which mix together so well.

Side note: having extra bunches of cilantro and an inability to waste fresh herbs led me to use alternative methods for preservation. I froze them in grandma's tin muffin tins. (That way I can just individually pop them into other concoctions—soups, pesto, salsa, etc.) The pico de gallo has to chill too, undisturbed in the fridge for 4-6 hours.

The happy day arrived for Leigh's celebration. We brought our pico de gallo with a little twist: rather than just having chips to dip, we also had cucumber slices. The dish was delish and everyone enjoyed hanging out. Next time, you need a relatively quick and healthy meal for an upcoming get-together or a Cinco de Mayo celebration, try pico de gallo. For a free informational guide including a recipe and nutritional facts, check out the Grow a Salsa Garden Workbook

The Great Sheep Escape RSS

Growing Ideas Blog

After five years of homework for school, plus a fulltime career, my husband graduates this spring with a MS in biomechanics. At a young age, I understood the importance of celebrating special occasions, so long before his actual graduation in May, I asked Mikey, “Do you want anything in particular for your big day?”

Unexpectedly, he matter-of-factly stated, “Lambs. I want lambs.”

All of the previous odd conversations at dinner parties over the past few months about sheep suddenly made sense. Admittedly, I tried to convince him otherwise. “What about a truck? A new computer?” It all came down to sheep.

My desire to live a greener lifestyle couldn‘t argue with the benefit of giving a home to cute, efficient grass mowers. We live out in the country and did our research, deciding on Navajo-Churro sheep. A local person unexpectedly acquired lambs recently (a story in itself). We brought them home last weekend. “How,” you ask? In the back of our Honda CRV of course!

Toro and Hera. Mike insisted on naming one after a lawn mowing company. We prepared for these adorable, snuggable livestock: barn, hay, mineral block, water, pasture, and a secure fence—the works. When placing them down in our yard, they appeared investigative yet comfortable inside the fence. So much so, that after the first half hour, we allowed them to explore our land unmonitored. Ten minutes after Mike and I retreated inside, we peeked outside from the kitchen window and noticed that they were nowhere to be found. Maybe they were under the deck? We looked in our yard to no avail.

Panic-stricken, we geared up quickly, searching our agriculturally zoned area. The worst-case-scenario crossed my mind: “What if we don‘t find the baby lambs?” We spread out. Mike went deeper and deeper into the manure fields behind our home. Knowing time was of the essence, I saw a farmer and ran 150 yards to his tractor.

My Midwestern polite came out while I was waving for him to stop, “Sorry to bother you. Did you by chance see two lambs running across your fields?”

“Ha-oh is that what that was? Yeah, I saw them a few minutes ago,” he said, pointing far off to the right.

“I see,” I replied and pointing said, “that is probably my husband way over there. Do you mind if I run across your fields to try and catch ‘em?”

“Of course not—good luck!” Replied the farmer among fields of manure.

I ran to Mike across the waves of cornstalks and piles of cow poop. Out of breath, I approached him within 20 yards of both sheep. Trying to predict the lambs‘ behavior, I yelled out, “Let‘s capture one and the other will come to us.” I have no experience in catching lambs.

Granted, even though I haven‘t really busted out my speed in years, I suggested, “Let‘s go for Hera.” At that point he was positioned between the two with Hera in the middle of us. We both ran for her. She darted absurdly fast. Mike missed her; trying to predict Hera‘s moves, I went for her. Veering left and focusing on footing, I dived into the manure. Scared, she paused and I covered her with my body. Mike looked shocked, but not enough to stop running for the next lamb.

He followed Toro, hoping the run-off stream two fields over would put a halt to Toro‘s escapade. It didn‘t. Boots filled with water, Mike pursued him. With Hera in my arms, I debated whether to wait or go back. I called out to him, “MI-KE!” No answer. Thinking that there was nothing else I could do carrying a 30lb plus lamb in my rapidly weakening arms, I began the long, long walk back.

After fifty yards of focusing on each footstep, I saw Mike far off in the distance. Not able to tell whether he had Toro, I yelled, “Do you have him?” Mike could not hear me. I waited.

Covered in water, manure, and exhausted, half-heartedly smiling, I saw Mike. Squinting, I sighed with relief when I noticed that he carried Toro in his arms. We slowly walked towards one another and after many steps, met. And after so many more steps and three rest breaks, made it back to our home. Even though our arms were painfully sore, we got up the gumption to survey our fencing and tiredly pounded more stakes anywhere the possibility allowed for escape.

Thus, our first day as sheep owners came to a close. Later that evening, we watched Toro and Hera blissfully munching away on the grass. I think we all hoped that the worst was over.

Seed Party RSS

Growing Ideas Blog

Have you ever grown cosmic purple carrots? As spring weather approaches so does my excitement for planting my next garden. Last weekend began my seed starting escapade with a group of friends of all ages. In other words, party time! Sharing the fun also spreads out the cost as each seed pack usually includes more than I need. An added bonus: organizing a seed starting party gives people the chance to experiment with varieties they wouldn‘t normally pick out for themselves.

Seed packets of broccoli, chiles, and lettuce were happily introduced to watercress, chamomile, and even, purple carrots. For ease of use and to help with dividing up each person‘s plantings, I brought along our Basic Seed-Starting Kit which included a bunch of different sized pots, plant markers, seeds, and soil. Having a variety of pots was really helpful when it came to what each gardener envisioned for their specific planting goals whether that included containers or raised beds.

After planting the seeds according to each packet‘s instructions and labeling them, we sprayed every one with the magical worm compost tea (see blog post 2/22/13) and put the seed trays into large, clear, plastic, storage containers, which act like mini-greenhouses. The result? You‘ll have to wait for a future post, but I challenge you to try something new this year with seed starting whether that be planting an unusual seed variety, creating mini-greenhouses, or having a seed party! To help my seed-loving friends, use code SPRING13 and save 10% at our shop through 4/15/13.

My Favorite Underrated Vegetable: Bok Choy RSS

Growing Ideas Blog

Since March is National Nutrition Month , it seems fitting to reflect on healthy eating. My latest craze? Out to dinner with friends at a local restaurant a few months ago, I received bok choy as a side to my southern fried chicken and immediately fell in love. In an effort to replicate the experience, I hunted it down at the local grocery store.

Excitedly lifting out of the bag, my hubby glanced at it and expressed a casual, only slightly curious response: “Bok choy? Mom put it in stir fry and told me it was a variety of celery.”

How did I cook this delicious vegetable, you ask? Easy peasy recipe! Rinse stalks, cut them into one inch pieces, add two tablespoons of minced garlic and two tablespoons of olive oil into a pan; fry to crispness-liking (usually five-eight minutes). Delectable when paired with fish!

The awesomeness of bok choy continues— packed with vitamin A and C, loaded with fiber, low in calories, and great served in a lot of different ways, especially in soups and on salads. What's your favorite underrated vegetable? Mine is listed on our Periodic Table of Vegetables. Go see if yours is listed also. To celebrate bok choy and other fabulous vegetables during National Nutrition Month, save 20% through the month of March using code: Veggie13

Start Composting RSS

Growing Ideas Blog

After purchasing a black worm factory, Mike (my significant other) and I wanted a compost pail to go in our kitchen. We found that it was essential to nuke fruits and veggies prior to putting them into the bin as it decreased the chances of a fruit fly invasion and increased the amount of deliciousness (or so we thought) for our hundreds of slimy pets.

We ventured to the nearest box store in search of the perfect compost pail. I wanted something that would contain smells and hold a decent amount of scraps without being an eyesore. By the time we reached the second store, we found it: a white, porcelain jar with a cover that twisted on top featuring a see-through plastic hole. It was beautiful, and I was happy! A month went by and its brilliance remained. At the two-month mark, I noticed that the twisted portion of it seemed to not really seal the container, leading to fruit flies and goop gathering around the top making it exceedingly more difficult to close. And washing the jar destroyed the glue on the cover. Beauty does not last. The stunning white became dingy and the jar developed an unwelcome sour smell, discouraging any potential brave disposal volunteers. Granted, the jar was probably never meant for what we were using it for, anyway.

Still, we needed something to allow us to share foods with our hungry little ones. Thank goodness I started my new position at the National Gardening Association as it taught me about the proper products for composting. Seriously, the odor free compost pail ended up being a great investment and my kitchen thanked me. I nuked the food before putting it into the compost pail and even though we smashed it in, much like we do the garbage, so as to avoid changing it until right before Friday pick up, the pail did not smell and featured the greenness that we were embracing. So as a treat for all of my readers, enjoy $5 off this great product for the next two weeks! Code: NOTSTINKY12

Growing Ideas Blog RSS

Growing Ideas Blog

Thank you for visiting our first blog! My name is Nichole and I plan to bring you interesting news and features from the wonderful world of kids’ gardening. Growing up in the Midwest with outdoorsy parents led me to love cheese and nature (not necessarily in that order). With a background in both education and nonprofit development, my goal is to provide you with resources and ideas that speak to young minds, educators, community organizations, and the general gardening public.

From working with my students, I have come to believe that focusing on connections among disciplines and relating academics to life experiences is essential to create interest, instill knowledge, and celebrate each student’s individuality. Giving individuals opportunities for hands-on learning through gardening with great products such as Math in the Garden and our Root Vue Farm not only encourages them to make connections, but also fosters healthy eating, environmental stewardship, and relationship building. As we work together in this endeavor, I invite you to reach out to me with questions, stories, and pictures: email me or call (800) 538-7476 ext 101

GWK Archive

April 14, 2014
How do you compost?

April 7, 2014
How to dye eggs — naturally!

March 31, 2014
April Fools' Day Fun

March 24, 2014
Join us for #FoodDayChat on 3/24/14 at 2pm ET

March 17, 2014
Square Foot Gardening Contest! Enter for your chance to win

March 10, 2014
New Early Season Gardening Products

March 3, 2014
March is National Nutrition Month

February 24, 2014
Books In Bloom is HERE!

February 17, 2014
Announcing our 2014 Digital Catalog

February 10, 2014
Homemade Valentines

February 3, 2014
Time to Plan Your Garden

January 27, 2013
Spring Catalog Sneak Peek

January 20, 2014
For the Birds

January 13, 2014
5 Easy Steps to Winter Sowing

January 6, 2014
2014: The Year of the Tomato

December 30, 2013
Fresh Food for Schools

December 23, 2013
Getting Creative for the Holidays

December 16, 2013
Holiday Fun with the Family

December 9, 2013
Last Minute Holiday Gift Ideas

December 2, 2013
TODAY ONLY: Cyber Monday Special Offer

November 25, 2013
Giving Thanks

November 18, 2013
Innovate

November 11, 2013
Top 10 Holiday Garden Gifts

November 4, 2013
Giving Back

October 28, 2013
Bright Ideas

June 21, 2013
Repurposing Extravaganza

June 7, 2013
What Do You Trug in Your Tubtrug?

May 17, 2013
Kids Day!

May 3, 2013
Cinco De Mayo Celebration

April 19, 2013
The Great Sheep Escape

April 5, 2013
Seed Party

March 8, 2013
My Favorite Underrated Vegetable: Bok Choy

March 1, 2013
Start Composting

Cedar Pyramid Trellis

Price: $129.95

Three Season Cold Frame

Reg Price: $229.95

SALE: $199.95

Elevated Raised Bed

Price: $189.95

Customer Service
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Email: customerservice@garden.org
Fax: 802-864-6889
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